Connect with us
Advertisment

Education

JUST IN: Government Shuts Down Lead British School Over Student’s Bully (VIDEO)

Published

on

JUST IN: Government Shuts Down Lead British School Over Student’s Bully (VIDEO)

JUST IN: Government Shuts Down Lead British School Over Student’s Bully (VIDEO)

 

Advertisment

 

 

Advertisment

 

 

 

Advertisement

 

 

Sahara Weekly Reports That The Federal Government has reportedly shut down Lead British School following the bully of a student named Namitira in the Abuja-based institution.

 

 

 

JUST IN: Government Shuts Down Lead British School Over Student’s Bully (VIDEO)

 

 

 

 

Two videos showing the student reportedly named Namtira being manhandled went viral on social media on Tuesday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In one of the videos, the victim was seen being slapped repeatedly by another female student while asking “Who broke my heart?”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In another video, the victim was seen sitting next to a male classmate who was heard saying “I spoilt her relationship”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Furthermore, the minister of women affairs has visited the school to address the situation. In a follow up video recorded this morning, the culprit was seen being slapped by a woman who is said to be the victim’s aunty.

 

 

Advertisment
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Education

From F9 parallel in WASSCE to first class in OAU, UNILAG don shares…

Published

on

From F9 parallel in WASSCE to first class in OAU, UNILAG don shares...

From F9 parallel in WASSCE to first class in OAU, UNILAG don shares…

 

Advertisment

 

 

Advertisment

Dr Adewale Tiamiyu, a lecturer in the Department of European Languages and Integration Studies at the University of Lagos, shares his remarkable educational journey from humble beginnings to academic success in this interview with IMOLEAYO OYEDEYI

From F9 parallel in WASSCE to first class in OAU, UNILAG don shares...

 

Advertisement

How did you feel when you had an ‘F9 parallel’ in your O’level exam?

That was in 1987. I felt it was over and it was not possible to go back to school. But I still tried. At that time, it was my social life that affected me. I used to be a break dancer. I also marched for my school: Adelagun Memorial Grammar School in Ibadan, Oyo State. But at the end of it all, I went to check my result and it was F9 parallel. So I lost hope. Though I later sat for the GCE exam, it wasn’t successful, because I did not have the English language. I tried the examination twice and I had E8 in the language. So I abandoned education in 1990. Between 1990 to 1995, I was in Cote d’Ivoire as a meat seller. So I travelled out of the country. However, I returned in 1995 to Lagos and registered for GCE lessons. At the same time, I worked as a primary school teacher in Surulere. So I prepared to go back to school between 1995 and 1997. I made my GCE in 1996 and got admitted into Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile Ife in 1997.

However, was it only the break dancing and extracurricular activities that made you fail the ‘level examinations?

 

 

No. That was not the only issue. Then, I was too social and had about 18 girlfriends in almost all Ibadan schools. In those days, we always went to different schools for inter-house sports and I would want to have at least one girlfriend in any school we visited. I am talking of the 80s now. So, I think it was my social life. It was later in life that I understood that I was not a dullard since I had a First Class in OAU years later. I used to think I was a dullard, but my academic achievement in Ife made me believe I was not. I was just not serious during my secondary school days.

What was the reaction of your parents to your O’level result at that time, did they also give up on your education?

They were disappointed that I had an F9 parallel in my O’level. But when I did GCE in 1988, I had credits in four subjects, excluding English. So I did GCE again and kept on having E. So I tried, but I couldn’t make the full five credits. And I never wanted to go to a polytechnic anyway. Assuming I wanted to do that, I could have combined my results. But I never wanted to go. I remember that after my first attempt, it was one of my girlfriends who taught me Mathematics, which made me pass the subject in the second examination, GCE. But I never had credits in English. And when I couldn’t get admission to the university, I wasn’t comfortable in my area anymore. So, I had to travel out of the country.

 

 

But why Cote D’IVoire?

I wanted to go to the United States from a French country. This was because most of my mates who didn’t make their results back then had travelled to Holland and other foreign countries just to take away that shame of not passing O’level. You know we were big guys in those days. And all our girlfriends had all gone to the universities because they made their results. So psychologically we were disturbed. We just felt the only option available for us was to go abroad and look for money. So that was why we travelled out. I had intended to go to the USA from Cote d’Ivoire. But when I got to Abidjan, I was disappointed with what I saw. I regretted travelling out. And even now, the phobia is still in me as I don’t want to travel out. Even if they are calling me in the same USA now, I already have that phobia that I don’t want to go and suffer anywhere in the world.

Do you know where some of the bright students in your secondary days are right now?

One of them is in my Faculty. We are both lecturing there. Though he is my senior now at the university, he used to be my classmate in secondary school. He went to the University of Ibadan and graduated in 1993. But I got admitted in 1997. However, having a First Class in Ife made it easy for me to start my lecturing career immediately as I was retained as a lecturer in my department between 2003 and 2005. So I think my First Class made up for the F9 issues I had in my secondary school. And now, I am even much more educated than some of those who came out with better results during my O’level days. I am a Ph.D holder now. But some of them don’t have a PhD. Each time they see me, they wonder how I made it. But I always say, it is never over until it is over. Life is a race anyway. This means if you are still alive, you can become anything. I am a goal-getter and I don’t think anything is possible.

What about your other friends who had the same poor O’level results at the time like you, where are they now and is there anyone among them who was able to overcome that setback?

None were able to overcome that setback of poor O’level results. There is even one at the University of Lagos where I work currently. He is a bricklayer. He never furthered his education after that experience. He is doing the bricklaying job at the university. In my set at the secondary school, we were about 600. And three of us from the same secondary school and class currently work in UNILAG. One is an Associate Professor. I am a lecturer and the third man is a bricklayer. The first man is my senior because I couldn’t catch up with those who had gone ahead of me. But the third person is still a bricklayer as we speak here in UNILAG. Though we still talk, he is not always comfortable around me, because he is not happy seeing me as a Dr, while he is a bricklayer. But I wanted to encourage him because I don’t believe anything is possible. I believe that if he can dream it, it is possible. I could remember that when I was doing my master’s programme at UNILAG. I used to trek from Ikotun to the university. I trekked more than 20 times to go for my studies that year. So I am the type that doesn’t give up on something.

What do you think often goes on in the mind of your secondary school classmate who is now a bricklayer each time he sees you?

 

 

Well, I think one of them will be the age factor. I am 54 years old now. But when I made my decision to go back to school in 1995, I was 26 years of age. I left Cote d’Ivoire as a meat seller with the determination to go back to school. So I decided at the right time and I got admission at the age of 29. I eventually graduated at the age of 32. So it was still possible for me to catch up with those who had gone far ahead of me. But if you tell my secondary school classmate who is now a bricklayer to go back to school now that he is also over 50 years of age, he won’t want to do that. This is because he is married with children now. It is too late now for him unless his children will send him to school. I remembered the story of a woman who got admission at the age of 64 to OAU to study law and she graduated at the age of 70. So it is not over until it is over. Life is just like a football match, once the referee has not blown the whistle, you can’t say this is who will win the match.

You went to Cote d’Ivoire intending to travel to the United States from there, so, how did you end up as a meat seller in that country?

 

 

When I got there, they asked me if I had an O’level result. I said I didn’t have one. They said that hadn’t been that I had an O’level result, I would have been employed to teach English in the primary school. It was at that time I learnt that if you went to secondary school and didn’t have an O’level result, you remained illiterate. For me, it was very difficult to get abroad from the French country especially when I had no evidence that I attended a secondary school. So the people in Abidjan then asked me which handwork I learnt. Then, I told them I didn’t learn any work. So that was why they got me a meat-selling job. I would go around the market with the meat in my tray to sell to people. That was in the Northern part of Cote d’Ivoire. Initially, I didn’t want to do it. But my maternal uncle, whom I stayed with, stopped feeding me at some point. He said he couldn’t be feeding someone that was not ready to work. So I had to accept the job.

But when you got to Ivory Coast and got disappointed, why didn’t you return to Nigeria?

It was not possible to return because I had no fares to do that. So I had to work. More so, before leaving Nigeria, I had promised my girlfriend that I would come back to take her to the United States. So that shame of failing to make it to the United States caught me. That was why I decided to stay back in the French country to work and gather money. I invested the money in the business of selling rice, potatoes, and onions but the business collapsed. So I had to come back to Nigeria in 1995 to pursue education. I took that decision because I discovered that if one does not go to school or has money, one can’t belong to any serious class in society. And since I had pursued money and couldn’t get it, I felt the only way left for me to have class in life was to go back to school. That was why I got back and started reading the Oxford English textbook for primary four, five, and six classes. I also read a lot in Cote d’Ivoire and that allowed me to master all the basics that I lost in the English language.

How correct is the claim that you once worked as a Septic tank evacuator?

That was when I returned to Lagos from Cote d’Ivoire. When I came back to Nigeria in 1995, I stayed with my uncle in the Aguda area in Surulere, Lagos. And evacuating septic tanks is what my uncle did then for a living. So one day, I asked him to give me money to buy books for my GCE lessons and he told me that I had to join him in the work. I said I was not interested. He then said he couldn’t give me any money if I was not ready to join him to do the work. That was why I agreed to do the work with him. But whenever we got any job then, he would give me only £1 out of the £10 he charged. Yet, I was the one that would enter the septic tank. But I still managed to do it for two years before I got admission in 1997. It was the money I made during those two years that I used to buy the books I needed for my pre-university education preparations. As God would have it, I eventually got admission to OAU to study the French-German language.

 

culled from PUNCHNG

Advertisment
Continue Reading

Business

ASR AFRICA BEGINS THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE ABDUL SAMAD RABIU CLASSROOM BLOCKS FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF UYO UNDER ITS TERTIARY EDUCATION GRANTS SCHEME

Published

on

ASR AFRICA BEGINS THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE ABDUL SAMAD RABIU CLASSROOM BLOCKS FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF UYO UNDER ITS TERTIARY EDUCATION GRANTS SCHEME

 

Advertisment

 

 

Advertisment

 

 

 

Advertisement

Uyo, May 9th, 2024

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sahara Weekly Reports That The Abdul Samad Rabiu Africa Initiative (ASR Africa) has commenced the construction of four classroom blocks for the University of Uyo in Akwa Ibom State with a groundbreaking held on the university campus today. This donation forms part of a grant given to the University of Uyo through the ASR Africa Tertiary Education Grants Scheme, which was drawn from ASR Africa’s US$100 million Fund for Social Development and Renewal.

 

 

 

 

ASR AFRICA BEGINS THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE ABDUL SAMAD RABIU CLASSROOM BLOCKS FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF UYO UNDER ITS TERTIARY EDUCATION GRANTS SCHEME

 

 

 

 

 

The Vice Chancellor of the University, Prof. Nyaudoh U. Ndaeyo, expressed his gratitude to ASR Africa for considering the University of Uyo as a worthy beneficiary of the Tertiary Education Grant Scheme. He emphasised that constructing these classroom blocks was a top priority for the university and requested that the project be completed quickly so that the institution could start using it. He also appreciated the Chairman of ASR Africa, Abdul Samad Rabiu, for his various interventions in tertiary institutions in the country.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Ubon Udoh, MD CEO of ASR Africa, whilst giving his remarks, applauded the management of the University of Uyo for their support project so far. He also reiterated the commitment of the founder and Chairman of ASR Africa, Abdul Samad Rabiu, to supporting quality education within the tertiary education system in Nigeria and Africa. He further urged the students to make good use of the new facility when it is completed.

 

 

 

 

ASR AFRICA BEGINS THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE ABDUL SAMAD RABIU CLASSROOM BLOCKS FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF UYO UNDER ITS TERTIARY EDUCATION GRANTS SCHEME

 

 

 

 

 

So far, over 27 public and private Nigerian universities and institutions of higher learning have benefitted from the ASR Africa Tertiary Education Grants, including the University of Maiduguri, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, the University of Ilorin, the University of Benin, and the University of Ibadan; Adamawa State University, University of Jos, Federal University of Technology, Minna amongst others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About ASR Africa

ASR Africa is the brainchild of the African Industrialist, Philanthropist, and Chairman of BUA Group, Abdul Samad Rabiu. The Abdul Samad Rabiu Africa Initiative (ASR Africa) was established in 2021 to provide sustainable, impact-based, homegrown solutions to developmental issues affecting Health, Education and Social Development within Africa.

 

 

 

 

Advertisment
Continue Reading

society

NAUB: MR PRESIDENT, WHO ARE THOSE PLANNING TO KILL THE ONLY FEDERAL UNIVERSITY THAT DOES NOT GO ON STRIKE? By Femi Oyewale

Published

on

Why the merger of NAUB with NDA cannot work, the hard facts to consider'

NAUB: MR PRESIDENT, WHO ARE THOSE PLANNING TO KILL THE ONLY FEDERAL UNIVERSITY THAT DOES NOT GO ON STRIKE? By Femi Oyewale

 

Advertisment

Sahara Weekly Reveals That Higher education in Nigeria, quite frankly, is facing immense challenges including but not limited to poor infrastructure, unrealistic academic calendars resulting in extra years against stipulated durations, lack of teaching equipment, social menace, poor funding, amongst others.

 

Advertisment

 

NAUB: MR PRESIDENT, WHO ARE THOSE PLANNING TO KILL THE ONLY FEDERAL UNIVERSITY THAT DOES NOT GO ON STRIKE? By Femi Oyewale

 

Advertisement

 

Interestingly, Nigerian Army University, Biu (NAUB) is quite unique from other federal universities in the sense that since inception, there has not been any issue of strike, cultism, protest, or anti-social conduct.

 

Rather, the university is reputed for its excellent condition of learning environment.

 

This was aptly covered by the Governor of Borno State, H.E Professor Babagana Umara Zulum through his deputy during the maiden edition of the convocation ceremony of NAUB on Saturday, October 28th, 2023 at the University’s main campus ( note not temporary campus within five years of existence) in Biu, Borno State.

 

 

The Borno State governor said he was physically present at the groundbreaking ceremony of the foundation laying stone of NAUB five years ago, and he is impressed by what he has seen adding that it must take military precision and focus to put in a full-fledged and functional university on a barren land in such a short period.

 

 

The Governor further thanked the Federal Government, the Nigerian Army, the traditional rulers, scholars and academics philanthropist, industrialists, associates and men and women of goodwill from within and outside Borno State for the selfless service of gradually re-modelling the future of Borno State in particular and Nigeria in general and for putting Borno State on the path of further greatness through the Nigerian Army university, Biu.

 

Why then do we plan to abort such a great independent institution of learning known as a barrier breaker and line crosser by merging it with NDA whose missions and visions are not in tandem with each other .

 

Why cut short the dreams of such noble ideas via politics?

 

Are there those who do not want a stable educational system in Nigeria?

Are there external forces or their agents at home trying to destroy a good foundation for a stable educational system in Nigeria?

 

Is NAUB in competition with the private universities?

Are there big shots who benefit from a chaotic educational system in Nigeria?

 

Are there some subterranean forces working within the system to achieve the Boko Haram objective that “education is sin”?

The words of Governor Zulum rings a wise bell when he said that Boko Haram insurgents have achieved their objectives if the university is scrapped.

“Therefore, we appeal to Mr. President to look into this issue so that the Army University Biu would remain a university… because of the importance of education in this part of the country, where Boko Haram is saying that education is forbidden. And I think that by allowing this Army university to be scrapped, they might have achieved one or two of their objectives,” he said.

 

The governor noted that, for over a decade, Borno State has been facing a serious crisis that has denied many children access to education.

“Therefore, this university is very important to not only the people of Borno State but our neighbouring states,” he said.

 

Look at the Western countries that started with military polytechnics that propelled revolution in military equipment development.

 

Many of these developed countries collaborated jointly through civil-military research.

The Swedish Defence University established like NAUB is Sweden’s leading resource in, and first choice for, education, training and research in the management of crisis, war and periods of tension in the leadership of both civil and military agencies. The Swedish Defence University is an accredited institution for academic education for military and civilian students and researchers where different experiences, approaches, and traditions come together. It has become a hub for both national and international students.

 

It might shock you to know that American Military University (AMU) and American Public University (APU). APUS is wholly owned by American Public Education, Inc., a publicly traded private-sector corporation that offers associates, bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees, in addition to dual degrees, certificate programs and learning tracks.

 

During my NYSC, I served in the Nigerian Army School of Education (NASE), Ilorin, which is a renowned military institution focused on providing high-quality education and training for Nigerian Army personnel and civilians. So why the proposed merger of NAUB?

 

Interestingly, the Nigerian Army University Biu provides such a platform for the Nigerian military towards technological innovation, research, and development in varied fields for national defence and security breakthroughs like many modern nations. In fact, instead of downgrading the Nigerian Army University, many more Army universities should be established in Nigeria. That is the way out for a caricature type of educational system that has failed to have stability over the years.

 

Who is not interested in seeing that a federal university graduates its students within the regular course time frame?

 

Must programmes of all federal universities be easily disrupted. A course of 4 or 5 years ends up taking over 6 to 7 years to complete. The worst part is that many universities end up in a crash programme to be able to cover up for the lost times. The terrible damage to these universities’ products is the very low standard of graduates.

 

Who wants the Nigerian educational system to collapse completely? These are rhetorical questions the amiable president of the Federal Republic of Nigeria and all stakeholders should ask those proposing the merger to answer us publicly, else should let the matter die forever in the abyss of hasty decision.

Advertisment
Continue Reading

Cover Of The Week

Trending